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Research Article |

Grain Yield, Yield Components and Quality of Bread Wheat (Triticum aesitivum L.) as Influenced by NPSB and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate in the Highlands of Bale, South Eastern Ethiopia

The experiment was conducted at three locations (Sinana on-station, Sinana on-farmandAgarfa) of Bale zone for three years from 2020-2022 during the main cropping season with the objective of elucidating the effects of NPSB and N rateon agronomic performance and grain quality of bread wheat. The experimental design in all locations was RCBD with three replications. Five NPSB rates (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 kg ha-1) and five nitrogen rates (0, 23, 46, 69 and 92kg N ha-1) were used as a treatment. The main effects of NPSB and N rate significantly influenced bread wheat thousand kernel weight and hectoliter weight, while interaction effects significantly influenced (P<0.05) grain yield, bio-mass yield and harvest index. Plant height and kernels per spike were not significantly influenced by applied NPSB and N rates. Main effects of NPSB and N rate significantly and variably influenced thousand kernel weight and hectoliter weight of bread wheat. The highest thousand kernel weight 45.3g and 45.6gwere recorded from 150 kg NPSB ha-1 and 69 kg N ha-1 rate, respectively. The highest hectoliter weight 81.9kghl-1 and 81.9kghl-1 were recorded from 150 kg NPSB ha-1 and 69 kg N ha-1 rate, respectively. The highest grain yield 5347 kg ha-1 was obtained from the interaction effects of 150 kg NPSB ha-1 and 69 kg N ha-1, respectively. The highest bio-mass yield 16306 kg ha-1and harvest index 42 were obtained from the interaction effects of 150 kg NPSB ha-1 and 69 kg N ha-1, respectively. The highest grain protein content (13.1%) and (13.5%) were also recorded from the highest NPSB rate (200 kg ha-1) and nitrogen rate (92 kg N ha-1) in statistical parity with (150 kg ha-1) and (69 kg N ha-1), respectively. According to the result of this study optimum bread wheat grain yield and quality was obtained at NPSB rate of 150kg ha-1and 69 kg N ha-1. Economic analysis also indicated that economically feasible NPSB and N rate were 150 kg ha-1 and 69kgN ha-1, respectively. Therefore, bread wheat producing farmers in the study area should use 150 kg ha-1 NPSB and 69 kg N ha-1 to realize maximum grain yield grain quality of bread wheat.

Bread Wheat, NPSB, Nitrogen, Grain Yield, Protein Content, Economic Analysis

APA Style

Bogale, M. (2023). Grain Yield, Yield Components and Quality of Bread Wheat (Triticum aesitivum L.) as Influenced by NPSB and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate in the Highlands of Bale, South Eastern Ethiopia. International Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, 8(1), 1-7. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijbc.20230801.11

ACS Style

Bogale, M. Grain Yield, Yield Components and Quality of Bread Wheat (Triticum aesitivum L.) as Influenced by NPSB and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate in the Highlands of Bale, South Eastern Ethiopia. Int. J. Bioorg. Chem. 2023, 8(1), 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.ijbc.20230801.11

AMA Style

Bogale M. Grain Yield, Yield Components and Quality of Bread Wheat (Triticum aesitivum L.) as Influenced by NPSB and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate in the Highlands of Bale, South Eastern Ethiopia. Int J Bioorg Chem. 2023;8(1):1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.ijbc.20230801.11

Copyright © 2023 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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